Bhanu Athaiya, the costume designer of the major films and the only Indian designer, who won an Oscar for the costumes, passed away in Mumbai at the age of 91. The Progressive Artists’ Group had been formed around the time. Chopra, Raj Kapoor, Vijay Anand, Raj Khosla, and Ashutosh Gowariker, and international directors such Conrad Rooks and Richard Attenborough. Bhanu Athaiya, costume designer and India’s first Oscar winner passed away on the morning of October 15, 2020. Gunga Jumna (1961), directed by Nitin Bose and ghost-directed by lead actor Dilip Kumar, was set in rural Uttar Pradesh. She ended up splitting responsibilities with John Mollo, and handled all the Indian costumes. She had been diagnosed with meningioma in 2012 but had continued to work; her last costume design was for the Marathi film … (1956). She had previously donated several documents, photographs, production notes and letters about the making of Gandhi to the Academy. This was the first time that “actual Indian handlooms and handicrafts were used” in a movie, Athaiya said in her memoir. Among the historical figures she dressed up in biopics were MK Gandhi and BR Ambedkar. The nuances that Athaiya wove into the costumes enhanced characterisation. Bhanu Athaiya, India’s first Oscar winner, passed away at the age of 91 on October 15 after a prolonged illness, said her daughter Radhika Gupta. He died when Bhanu Athaiya was 10. Apart from Oscars, Bhanu Athaiya also won two National Film Awards in 1991 and 2002. “Thank you, Sir Richard Attenborough, for focusing world attention on India.”. Her father was a self-taught artist and photographer who also worked in the productions of pioneering Indian filmmaker Baburao Painter. However, unknown to many, the first Indian to ever receive an Oscar had been Bhanu Athaiya, a costume designer, way back in 1983 for the movie Gandhi, Lord Richard Attenborough’s magnum opus. [1], Athaiya died on 15 October 2020 from complications of brain cancer at a medical center in South Mumbai, aged 91. Mumbai: Costume designer Bhanu Athaiya, India's first Oscar winner, died at her home on Thursday after prolonged illness, her daughter said. First Indian to win an Oscar, Bhanu Athaiya wants to return her award. [3], She made her debut as a film costume designer with the film C.I.D. My stepping in relieved them of this tension. Costume designer Bhanu Athaiya, who became the first Indian to win an Oscar, is no more. “Before I entered the scene, things worked very differently,” she explained in an interview with Rediff.com in 2010. “What one saw in the film industry was that the director and set designer would put their heads together and call in a tailor. Athaiya also created one of Mumtaz’s best-known costumes – a candy-orange, pre-pleated sari that resembled an ankle-length skirt. RIP Bhanu Athaiya🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽 What an amazing, committed Costume designer she was. “I carried on with my work, but confined myself to the wardrobe department and covered my face with dupattas for the entire shoot.”. The costumes were the result of creativity as well as research. Athaiya forged a long connection with Raj Kapoor, designing the costumes for Sangam (1964), Mera Naam Joker (1970), Satyam Shivam Sundaram (1978), Prem Rog (1982) and Ram Teri Ganga Maili (1985). [11] On 13 January 2013, Athaiya presented a copy of the book to the Dalai Lama. She used a shade of pale orange associated with Buddhist monks who used locally grown parijat flowers to dye their robes, she said in her autobiography. She used only khadi and handloom fabrics and dressed the Indian women in bright colours and their British counterparts in pale pastels. Athaiya was born in Kolhapur in Maharashtra of British India. Her most well-regarded films, which sent thousands of women viewers scurrying to their tailors for knock-offs of the clothes the stars had worn on screen, included Amrapali, Waqt, Brahmachari, Teesri Manzil, Guide, Reshma Aur Shera, 1942: A Love Story, Lagaan and Swades. “I wanted to do full justice to Mumtaz’s attractive and free spirit,” Athaiya wrote in her memoir The Art of Costume Design (HarperCollins India, 2010). Bhanu Athaiya (1929-2020): Oscar-winning costume designer was a cut above the rest Before Bhanu Athaiya, the Oscar-winning designer, there was Bhanu Athaiya, the modernist painter Oscars 2012. Bhanu Athaiya was born on April 28, 1929 in Kolhapur, Kolhapur State, British India as Annasaheb Rajopadhye. “I conceived and executed the entire look for this film, from the villagers of Champaner, to the British regiment and the group of English civilians,” she wrote. [4][5] She also won two National Film Awards, in 1991[6] and 2002. The movie wasn’t completed, but a photograph of Nargis’s piscine-themed gown survives. The iconic designer outfitted a host of actors in a long list of movies that include names like C.I.D (1956), Waqt and Guide (1965), Teesri Manzil and … Its founding members included some of India’s future canvas kings – MF Husain, FN Souza, KH Ara, SH Raza. Athaiya began designing individual pieces for films in 1953, including an outfit for Nargis for a song in Ek Tha Raja Ek Thi Rani, which began production in the late 1950s. “The Handloom House had opened a huge showroom on Mahatma Gandhi Road in Mumbai… I came across a range of village prints and saris here, which were extremely authentic.”. Bhanu held the prestigious distinction for 26 years before the Slumdog Millionaire crew stole the show. Costume designer Bhanu Athaiya, who became the first Indian to win an Oscar, is no more. While Athaiya was the first Indian to get an Oscar, she was associated with another production that made it to the shortlist of entries in the Foreign Language category. Athaiya based her costumes on the wall paintings at the Ajanta caves in Aurangabad. Athaiya, who won an Oscar for her work in the 1983 film Gandhi, passed away peacefully in her sleep, her daughter Radhika Gupta told PTI. She was the first Indian to win an Oscar, for Richard Attenborough’s biopic Gandhi (1982). Mumtaz wore the ensemble in the song Aaj Kal Tere Mere Pyaar Ke Charche from Bhappi Sonie’s Brahmachari (1969). Bhanu Athaiya (née Annasaheb Rajopadhye; 28 April 1929 – 15 October 2020) was an Indian costume designer. She won an Oscar in 1983 for Richard Attenborough's Gandhi. Costume designer Bhanu Athaiya, who won the first Academy Award for India, has died at the age of 91. Apart from doing illustrations for Eve’s Weekly, she was designing clothes at a boutique, and her clients included movie stars such as Kamini Kaushal and Nargis. [7], In a career spanning over 100 films, she worked with Indian filmmakers such as Guru Dutt, Yash Chopra, B.R. She worked on over 100 films, with Indian filmmakers such as Guru Dutt, Yash Chopra, B.R. For his Shree 420 (1955), Athaiya worked on the costumes worn by second lead Nadira. The design is an example of both imagination and expediency – Mumtaz needed to freely wriggle her hips and match steps with co-star Shammi Kapoor for the vigorously choreographed track. If the film’s heroine, Vyjayanthimala, looked as though she had stepped out of a fresco, the effect was intended. She was 91. 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A Memoir (Stellar Publishers, 2007). An Oscar winner for her work in Gandhi , Ms Athaiya has been designing costumes since 1953. First Indian to win an Oscar, Bhanu Athaiya wants to return her award. Directed by Sunil Dutt and starring him and Waheeda Rehman, Reshma Aur Shera was a career high for Athaiya on account of the freedom she was given to implement her vision. The Lycra-legging-style churidar, which you now find in department stores such as Westside and Lifestyle, can be traced back to this look.”. Bhanu Athaiya has been an important name in pioneering Indian cinema. Bhanu Athaiya made history on April 11, 1983, when she became the first Indian to win an Oscar. Gaitonde marked the association in the 1952 painting Portrait of Bhanu. Athaiya could recreate mundane reality as deftly as she could conjure up oopmh. I would listen to the director, make a sketch, meet the actor and finalise the outfit.”. India's first Academy Award winner Bhanu Athaiya has passed away at the age of 91. Winner of an Oscar award, the pride of our country, yet so very humble. Athaiya credited her father with being “her guiding light”. Credit: Michael Montfort/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images. She attended a wedding to make notes on how the local women dressed and bedecked themselves, and closely studied turban tying styles. in 1956,[4] and followed it up with other Guru Dutt films such as Pyaasa (1957), Chaudhvin Ka Chand (1960) and Sahib Bibi Aur Ghulam (1962). Athaiya’s contribution to Indian modernist art was commemorated by the show The Progressive Revolution: Modern Art for a New India at the Asia Society Museum in New York City in 2018. Chopra, Raj Kapoor, Vijay Anand, Raj Khosla, and Ashutosh Gowariker; and international directors such Conrad … She was … She was 91 and died at her residence after prolonged illness. Bhanu Athaiya, who got the coveted award for costume design in film Gandhi - wants to return it, as she feels that the government would not be … The directors with whom Athaiya worked reads like a Who’s Who of Indian cinema – Raj Kapoor, Guru Dutt, BR Chopra, Yash Chopra, Vijay Anand, Raj Khosla, Ashutosh Gowariker, Jabbar Patel and Vidhu Vinod Chopra. In 2012, Athaiya returned her Oscar statuette to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for safekeeping. She worked at a time when the chief requirement was to make heroines look glamorous and desirable. She praised her mother, Shantabai, for giving her the “freedom to move to a big city in pursuit of my studies at a time when women did not have such opportunities…”. “This is too good to be true,” Athaiya said in her acceptance speech. She was a total backroom player, for … She was the first Indian to win an Academy Award, winning one for costume design for Gandhi in 1982. Bhanu Athaiya, the legendary costume designer whose creations shaped the look of Hindi cinema between the 1950s and the 2000s, died on Thursday at the age of 91 in Mumbai. For the movie’s popular song Zindagi Ittefaq Hain, Mumtaz was squeezed into figure-hugging dresses with slits that conveyed her character’s sensuality. She made history by winning the Oscar for Best Costume Design for L Her career began by designing clothes for Guru Dutt's films, starting with C.I.D. Bhanu Athaiya pictured with “Gandhi” director Richard Attenborough at the 55th Academy Awards. “I was advised by my senior artist friends to continue painting, as I definitely had the talent to make it in the world of art,” Athaiya wrote. India's first ever Oscar winner, costume designer Bhanu Athaiya, has died at the age of 91. Once again, Athaiya visited the location, in Bhuj in Gujarat, for inspiration. She won the Academy Award for Best Costume Design (shared with John Mollo) for her work in the 1982 film, Gandhi. [2], Athaiya started her career as a freelance fashion illustrator for various women's magazines in Bombay, including the 'Eve's Weekly'. “The lyrics of the song, the mischief in Mumtaz’s eyes and the spirit of the dress all came together to create a legend in Hindi commercial cinema.” The garment, which had a zip on the side to permit easy movement, came to be known as the Mumtaz sari. Athaiya's father, Annasaheb was a painter. In early films, she was credited as the “dress designer”. 'The Last Color' review: Celebrity chef Vikas Khanna's film has got its heart at the right place She had been ailing for several years. She was bedridden in recent years after … Athaiya’s credits in the 2000s included Jabbar Patel’s Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar and Ashutosh Gowariker’s Swades (2004). Mumbai, Jan 21: Oscar-winning costume designer Bhanu Athaiya will receive the lifetime achievement honour at the Laadli National Media Awards for Gender Sensitivity, while filmmaker Gauri Shinde will be awarded for her debut movie "English Vinglish" at the event to be held here Feb 5. Bhanu Athaiya (née Annasaheb Rajopadhye; 28 April 1929 – 15 October 2020) was an Indian costume designer.She worked on over 100 films, with Indian filmmakers such as Guru Dutt, Yash Chopra, B.R. Costume designer Bhanu Athaiya, India’s first Oscar winner, died at her home on Thursday after prolonged illness, her daughter said. She was 91. Athaiya, who worked in over 100 films, was the first Indian to win the prestigious Oscar Award. He died when Athaiya was nine years old. I had the great privilege of working with her in the Marathi film " Katha Don Ganpatravanchi" 🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽 — Renuka Shahane (@renukash) October 15, 2020 Credit: Michael Montfort/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images. Movies. I am very happy that my Oscar has gone to the right place,” she told the news agency PTI at the time. “I have no regrets at all. Athaiya, who was then working under her maiden name Bhanu Rajopadhye, contributed three works to the third PAG show in Mumbai in 1953 – she was the only woman to have this honour. She was one of seven children. Later when its editor opened a boutique, she asked Athaiya to try designing dresses, hereupon she discovered her flair for designing clothes. image copyrightGetty Images image captionDirector Richard Attenborough asked Bhanu Athaiya to work on the Oscar-winning film about Mahatma Gandhi Celebrated Bollywood costume designer Bhanu Athaiya, India’s first Oscar winner, has died at the age of 91, her family says. In Search of Gandhi, Richard Attenborough’s account of the making of the Mahatma Gandhi biopic, attributed “…the veracity of the period clothes worn both by the huge crowds and the principal actors” to Athaiya’s “eagle eye”. Bhanu Athaiya, the costume designer who became the first Indian to win an Oscar, for Richard Attenborough’s “Gandhi” (1982), died at her home in Mumbai Thursday after a prolonged illness. Another costume that was closely associated with its wearer was Sadhana’s fitting churidar and knee-length tunic in Yash Chopra’s Waqt (1965). For the last three years, she was bedridden because one side [of her body] was paralysed.”. Athaiya shared the honour with her British collaborator John Mollo. Tribute Bhanu Athaiya (1929-2020): Oscar-winning costume designer was a cut above the rest Her iconic creations shaped the look of Hindi cinema between the 1950s and the 2000s. She finally managed to join JJ School of Art, and graduated in 1952. The Modern and the Secular in Indian Art that although “Rajopadhye’s career as an artist did not last long –she was quickly seduced by the movie industry – two of her paintings from the 1953 exhibition suggest that she shared stylistic commonalities with Husain and Gaitonde early in their careers, being similarly inspired by seventeenth-century Pahari miniatures”. “The costume looked somewhat bare, but it was skin-fitted, and Bhanu lent that authenticity.”. Athaiya’s legacy survives beyond these pieces of paper and her pictorial autobiography in the movies that she helped shape with her unique eye and firm hand. Athaiya is survived by her daughter, Radhika Gupta. Co-curator Zehra Jumabhoy wrote in an essay titled A Progressive Revolution? Bhanu Athaiya pictured with “Gandhi” director Richard Attenborough at the 55th Academy Awards. [15], Black and White / Color separate (1948–1956, 1959–1966), National Film Award for Best Costume Design, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, "Oscar-winning costume designer Bhanu Athaiya passes away", "Bhanu Athaiya - India's first Oscar winner walks down memory lane", "From dandy to Dandi, it was a long journey", "Bhanu Athaiya, India's first Oscar winner, dies age 91", "Bhanu Athaiya, India's First Oscar Winner for 'Gandhi,' Dies at 91", "Veteran costume designer Bhanu Athaiya, India's first Oscar winner, dies at 91", "The Art of Costume Design, by Bhanu Rajopadhye Athaiya", "No one will fight China to make a stand for Tibet", April 2010&pubname=Times+of+India+-+Mumbai&edname=&articleid=Ar01307&publabel=TOI "Athaiya meets Dalai Lama", "First Indian to win an Oscar, Bhanu Athaiya wants to return her award", "Bhanu Athaiya returns Oscar fearing theft", "The 55th Academy Awards (1983) Nominees and Winners", Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, British Academy of Film and Television Arts, "Filmfare: 'Jodha...' bags 5, Priyanka, Hrithik shine", "NGO to honour Bhanu Athaiya with Lifetime Achievement award", "Bhanu Athaiya movies and filmography - Cinestaan.com", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bhanu_Athaiya&oldid=996120353, Best Costume Design Academy Award winners, Best Costume Design National Film Award winners, Sir Jamsetjee Jeejebhoy School of Art alumni, All Wikipedia articles written in Indian English, Wikipedia articles with WORLDCATID identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 24 December 2020, at 17:19.